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New-release crime promotion

This October we’ve got a thrilling crime promotion for you to sink your teeth into. We’ve teamed up with local WA booksellers to give you not one, but two crime books when you shop our new-release crime titles! Visit any of the following participating stores this month and purchase one of our new crime titles – Death Leaves the Station by Alexander Thorpe, Doom Creek by Alan Carter, Over My Dead Body by Dave Warner and Shore Leave by David Whish-Wilson – and you will receive a free copy of one of our selected Fremantle Press crime titles.

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From same-sex romance in YA novels to First Nations stories, literary salons, virtual book clubs and movie nights, these upcoming author gigs with Dave Warner, Holden Sheppard, Norman Jorgensen, Stephen Kinnane and Yuot A. Alaak are sure to tickle your fancy, so pop these dates in your diary and set a reminder

Holden Sheppard will be part of a virtual Belmont Book Club meeting where he will discuss his early work, his award-winning debut novel, Invisible Boys, and what he has planned for the future. Free to attend, the event will be held on Zoom and you can register here.

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CEO Jane Fraser brings light and darkness to international readers with back-to-back foreign rights sales of Littlelight and Doom Creek

Welcome to May. How is our bookish tribe faring this month? Have you broken the Goodreads algorithm by smashing out your 2020 Reading Challenge in the first quarter? Here at Fremantle Press, right at the moment when the physical world seemed to contract to what was experienced from the lounge room or the home office, our local WA stories expanded into new territories and formats.

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When crime writer Alan Carter saw his outlook beginning to resemble an apocalyptic creek of doom, he got on with the business of writing the sequel to Marlborough Man

Fiction has always been a fluid concept: the wispy smoke of a doused campfire, the dangerous flaring of a forgotten ember, the promise of a speck of brightness in a gold pan. But these days, how the hell are you meant to imagine the unimaginable when it is surpassed most days in your news feed? I can pretty much put my finger on that square on the calendar when the new abnormal kicked off: November 2016.

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