SHOP NOW: free delivery anywhere in Australia for two or more books

Book clubs

Want to read the latest news?

Subscribe to enews

Reading is 'an amazing gift' say new local literary ambassadors

City of Melville residents Liz Byrski, Ambelin Kwaymullina and Brendan Ritchie are our inaugural Great Big Book Club Tea Party reading ambassadors. The three authors have expressed their excitement about taking on the task of promoting the benefits of reading to local audiences.

Read more

Book journeys

Didn’t have the time or money to get away this summer? Don’t despair! A good read can take you anywhere. Here are our suggestions for travelling by the book.

Read more

Good wine and great crime in Denmark

Silverstream Wines Denmark will present Crime Wave with Alan Carter and Dave Warner on 4 November 2017. Hosted by John McGlue, the event celebrates the release of Silverstream’s 2013 Riesling and 2014 Pinot Noir. Guests can enjoy readings and author interviews in the Silverstream Gardens while picnicking on sumptuous fare from Great Southern Oysters, Dellendale Cheese and Little Villain gourmet hampers.

Read more

What’s in a book cover design?

Sometimes a book fits into a very specific genre – a genre whose covers have a very specific set of codes that signal to readers what they can expect to find in that book. We all know, for instance, what kind of material will be in a book featuring the upper body of Fabio. But what about those books that are considered genre-busting?

Read more

WA author shortlisted for Ned Kelly

Fremantle Press has been recognised on the Ned Kelly Awards shortlist for the third year in a row. Burn Patterns by Como author Ron Elliott is in the running for a 2017 Best First Fiction prize in Australia’s most prestigious crime writing award.

Read more

Treasuring Kim Scott

Benang by Kim Scott is the latest Fremantle Press Treasure. It was the first book by an Indigenous writer to win the Miles Franklin Literary Award and, after nearly two decades, its continued relevance, its scope, language and largeness of spirit shows why it won our most prestigious prize, and why Scott went on to win it again.

Kim Scott says: ‘Telling Harley’s story felt very important at the time. I wanted to tentatively map a path of recovery from some of the damage of our shared history – the rationalisation of colonisation, the deaths and loss and the reductionist discourses about identity.'

Read more